Review: Cook-A-Doodle-Doo! by Susan Stevens Crummel, Illustrated by Janet Stevens

%CookaDoodleDooo

Book Information:

Cook-A-Doodle-Doo! by Stevens Crummel
Illustrated by Janet Stevens
Voyager Books
Published in 1999
ISBN 9780152056582
48 Pages

Series Information:

Retelling and/or Sequel to The Little Red Hen.
Not a series.

Review/Rating:

5 out of 5

Ease of Reading Text: 5 out of 5
Illustrations: 5 out of 5
Plot: 5 out of 5

The Rooster is tired of eating the same thing every single day, so he gets the idea to be like his grandmother, the Little Red Hen, and cook something. However, will no one help him cook it?

Okay, I’m going to call this a sequel to The Little Red Hen, even though it really isn’t because it only mentions it only a little bit. Though, I guess it could also be considered a retelling. Oh, well, I’m going to call it a retelling/sequel. xD

Anyways, it has the same basic outline as The Little Red Hen, but it has a couple of differences. I’ll just let you read it, so you can find them out yourself. However, I think it has more comedy and humor than in The Little Red Hen. I also liked how there were cooking tips on the side of the story. I loved the twists the author put on the story, and the personalities of the characters. :)

The illustrations were kind of good since they reminded me of how they were like when I was a kid. It was also very easy to see/read the text. :D

Overall, I like this retelling/sequel of The Little Red Hen. Go ahead and go read it to your children.

Where I Got It:

Won in a drawing from my library, and I still own a copy.

Challenges Apart Of:

Goodreads 2011

Re-Reading:

Not planning to re-read.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Susan Stevens Crummel
$New_Bullet Janet Stevens
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet Pied Piper Pics

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

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Review: The Three Bully Goats by Leslie Kimmelman, Illustrated by Will Terry

%TheThreeBullyGoats

Book Information:

The Three Bully Goats by Leslie Kimmelman
Illustrated by Will Terry
Picture Window Books
Published in 2011
ISBN 9781404861657
32 Pages

Series Information:

Not a series.

Review/Rating:

5 out of 5

Ease of Reading Text: 5 out of 5
Illustrations: 5 out of 5
Plot: 5 out of 5

Three goats, Gruff, Rugg, and Tuff, are nothing but bullies to everyone in the meadow. When they pass over the little ogre’s bridge, they ruin the peace on the other side of the meadow. However, the bullies will learn their lesson, when they pick on the wrong animal.

This book puts a very nice twist on the children’s classic, The Three Billy Goats Gruff. It still has the basic outline of the original, but the author changes the characters personality and even adds something to make it a little different from it. The author makes it so that the goats are the bad guys and the ogre is the good one. Even with some slight changes, it was still a nice and interesting take.

Also, I think the illustrations were more adorable than the original. :P They had a very soft and gentle feeling to them, and they were enjoyable to look at. It was also very easy to read/see the text.

Overall, the book is a very enjoyable read, so go ahead and read it to your children. :D

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

Goodreads 2011

Re-Reading:

Not planning to re-read.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Leslie Kimmelman
$New_Bullet Will Terry
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet The QuickWitLitniks

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review: And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, Illustrated by Henry Cole

%AndTangoMakesThree

Book Information:

And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell
Illustrated by Henry Cole
Simon & Schuster for Young Readers
Published in 2005
ISBN 9780689878459
32 Pages

Series Information:

Not a series.

Review/Rating:

4 out of 5

Ease of Reading Text: 5 out of 5
Illustrations: 3 out of 5
Plot: 5 out of 5

Based on a true story, Roy and Silo are two penguins who are a couple, but when they notice all the other penguins having babies, they want one as well. Then, their caretaker, Mr. Gramzay, gives them a left over egg to take care of. And when Tango is hatched, they created a new kind of penguin family.

This is one of the top ten challenged books in 2006, 2007, and 2008. It was also number two for 2009. Anyways, I can’t see how it is one of the top challenged children’s books. It only retells a true story about penguins in New York. Yeah, sure, it is about two male penguins, but it goes in about how there are different types of families. I guess most people are just too touchy about subjects like two males being together, even if it is penguins.

I thought the story/plot was cute, even if it is based on a true story. You might have to explain some weird things, if your kid asks about it. But it might be a good way to start explaining different kinds of families and not to start hate over different people. Anyways, I really didn’t like the illustrations that much, but they did remind me of how picture books used to be – colored with colored pencils. :X

The only lesson I can think that’s in there is to not judge different kinds of families, which makes it sort of enjoyable. Anyways, it is a good read to read to your children, and I think they will love the illustrations, even if they are basic looking. And if they do ask questions, explain it without hate or judging. :)

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

Goodreads 2011
Banned/Challenged No Limit

Re-Reading:

Not planning to re-read.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Justin Richardson
$New_Bullet Peter Parnell
$New_Bullet Henry Cole
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet Books for Kids Blog
$New_Bullet The Quick Wit Litniks

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review: There’s a Cat in the Library by Vicki Myron and Bret Witter, Illustrated by Steve James

%DeweyTheresACatintheLibrary

Book Information:

There’s a Cat in the Library by Vicki Myron and Bret Witter
Illustrated by Steve James
Little, Brown and Company
Published in 2009
ISBN 9780316068741
40 Pages

Series Information:

Dewey
Not really a series, but there are some books about Dewey.

Review/Rating:

5 out of 5

Ease of Reading Text: 5 out of 5
Illustrations: 5 out of 5
Plot: 5 out of 5

This is the illustrated children’s book version of Vicki Myron’s adult book, Dewey the Library Cat. Dewey is new to being a library cat, as he is trying to figure out what a library cat does, he wonders if he is the right cat for the job.

I decided to start reviewing some picture books because I keep on seeing really cute ones in the library, and this is my first one that I am reviewing on here. While most people don’t like it is based on a true story from another author, I like it. Why? Because it gives a chance for little kids to broaden their horizons even though they aren’t on the adult reading level yet.

Anyways, I like the children’s book version, but I’m not too sure if I would like the adult book. >.>” The author(s) made it really easy and fun to read for children. The illustrations make it even more enjoyable. They were so cute and soft that I looked at the pages extra long. :)

There aren’t really any special hidden lessons for children in the book, but it is still really enjoyable. Anyways, it is a good read to read to your children, and I think they will love the illustrations.

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

Goodreads 2011

Re-Reading:

Not planning to re-read.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Vicki Myron
$New_Bullet Bret Witter
$New_Bullet Steve James
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet Books for Kids Blog
$New_Bullet The Quick Wit Litniks

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

2nd Review: The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd

%TheCasebookofVictorFrankenstein
Book Information:
The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd
Nan A. Talese/Doubleday
Published in 2008
ISBN 9780385530842
353 Pages

Series Information:

Not a series.

Review/Rating:

4 out of 5

2ND REVIEW. 1ST REVIEW IS HERE.

After Victor Frankenstein goes to London to study at Oxford, he meets Percy Bysshe Shelley. They become fast friends, but with Shelley’s radical views, will Victor get an idea that will put him on the road to darkness?

This is the second time I’m reviewing this because I want to. :X Actually, I’m re-doing some (most) of my reviews so that I can make them (hopefully) better. With this one, I will compare it to the original a little bit more.

Anyways, in this retelling of Frankenstein, Peter Ackroyd makes it out so that a fictional character actually knows historically accurate people. I still find that part of this part kind of intriguing, and it also made this book rather interesting than if the author just told it through Victor Frankenstein’s and a little bit from his monster’s perspective. However, now that I read the original, I don’t know what perspective is better since they both were interesting, so they both get equal points for that.

Although how both Mary Shelley and Peter Ackroyd told the story receives equal points, the descriptions and the growth of the characters actually goes to Peter Ackroyd. With Mary Shelley’s, it is mostly someone re-telling Victor Frankenstein’s story as Victor tells him it, so the growth and descriptions really don’t have that much room to grow. So, basically, I like how Peter Ackroyd tells it because the way he makes the characters grow appeals to me more than the original. Also, in Ackroyd’s version, the person who turned out to be the “monster” was someone Victor Frankenstein knew and maybe even friends with. I found that also very interesting and even gave the monster even more of an identity than Shelley’s version. The characters are also completely different in Ackroyd’s version. It has the same thing happen to a character in each book, but the circumstance and character are off. I also like how Ackroyd did his version in that aspect as well since it had a little bit more depth and development than the original.

Let’s see, some other things that are different, but I wish Ackroyd put in his version. In Mary Shelley’s version, I actually felt like crying and feeling pity towards both Frankenstein and his monster. However, with Ackroyd’s version, it had less emotion. Also, the ending is more disappointing and confusing than the original. The ending in the original is more emotional and appeals more to me.

Now that I had a chance to read the original, I think it would have been better if some of the original’s aspects, like some of the emotion, were in this book. So, I rated it a four stars this time because, despite the original re-telling thing, I like the emotion and ending of the original Frankenstein more.

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

Goodreads 2011

Re-Reading:

This is the 2nd review, 1st review is here.
Not planning to re-read.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Peter Ackroyd
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet New York Times Book Review
$New_Bullet A Study of Reading Habits

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review: The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd

%TheCasebookofVictorFrankenstein

Book Information:

The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd
Nan A. Talese/Doubleday
Published in 2008
ISBN 9780385530842
353 Pages

Series Information:

Not a series.

Review/Rating:

5 out of 5

When Victor Frankenstein goes to London to study at Oxford, he meets Percy Bysse Shelley, and they form a friendship. Will this radical thinker change Victor’s musings into creating life? If he succeeds this madness, what will befall him and those around him?

In this retelling of Frankenstein, Peter Ackroyd makes it out so that Victor Frankenstein, a fictional character, actually knows Percy Bysshe Shelley, Godwin, Lord Byron, John Polidori, and even Mary Shelley, historically accurate people. I find that part of this part kind of intriguing, and it also made this book rather interesting than if the author just told it through Victor Frankenstein’s and a little bit from his monster’s perspective.

The description and characters’ personality were all wonderfully done, but whether it is from solely from this author, borrowed from Mary Shelley, or a combination of his and Mary Shelley’s works, I wouldn’t know. Reading this retelling has made me want to read the original writing of the novel, so I can compare and see how much is his and how much is from the original. Also, the person who turned out to be the “monster” was someone Victor Frankenstein knew and maybe even friends with. I found that also very interesting and even gave the monster even more of an identity.

Let’s see, I don’t really know what I didn’t like about the book, but the ending may be a little disappointing and unfulfilled for some (most) people. To me, the ending is only a little disappointing and unfinished, but the ending is still a little bit intriguing. Also, I think the ending of this book differs from the original. I’m not sure. :|

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

None.

Re-Reading:

Once with a 2nd review added.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Peter Ackroyd
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet New York Times Book Review
$New_Bullet A Study of Reading Habits

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review: Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers

%RedeemingLove

Book Information:

Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers
Multnomah Publishers
Published in 1997
ISBN 1576738167
479 Pages

Series Information:

Not a series.

Review/Rating:

5 out of 5

As a prostitute, the only way Angel can stay sane and survive is by keeping what she hates the most always in her mind, never forgetting it for a second. What she hates the most are men who only use her, and she always thought men are all the same, that is, until Michael Hosea. One day, when Michael saw her walking, God told him to marry Angel, and so he goes to convince her. It takes several visits to convince her and break what she thinks of men, but when Michael is about to give up, an accident causes them to live together. After they arrive at his house, he is faced with a new challenge: Convincing Angel that he really actually does love her. Though, whenever someone thaws her frozen heart, she runs away out of fear. What will it take for Angel to stay and love Michael? Well, that depends on if she can face the one thing she always tries to run away from.

I don’t normally read Christian fiction, but the summary of the book is what drew me to it — not the fact it was about religion or had religion aspects in the book. I don’t really like Christian fiction due to the fact that normally it is too much religion and not enough plot put into the book — this book doesn’t do that. :)

This book is really inspirational and heart-warming; I was pretty much trying not to cry throughout half of the book. ;) Even though it is a retelling of a biblical story, this book was so good that I couldn’t put it down — I read it in less than 2 days. I love the descriptions she uses (and the author uses a lot of them). :) This book left me thinking of several things that other Christian fiction books don’t let me think about — other Christian books shove religion down your throat, which is another thing I like about this book. :( The plot of this book is really good and will be emotional and get you thinking about things about life and some other serious issues. Though, personally, I was reading it for the romance part of the book. :P And the ending of the book is pretty good — not really rushed and there’s an epilogue chapter to find out what happens to them in the end. :)

I’m not going to post anymore than that because, well, you should really read it. :) Just one more thing, since there are sensitive and serious issues in the book, I wouldn’t read this book if you are immature.

Where I Got It:

Checked out from the library.

Challenges Apart Of:

None.

Re-Reading:

Not planning to re-read, but leaning towards maybe.

Other Reviews/Author Site:

$New_Bullet Francine Rivers
$New_Bullet Goodreads
$New_Bullet Library Thing
$New_Bullet Average Girl Reads
$New_Bullet Tina’s Book Reviews

Places to Buy From:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble